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The Intentions Biography

album1Cross three talented Toronto instrumentalists with smart songwriting abilities and a knack for subtle humor and the resulting product is independent upstarts The Intentions. Formed around the energy of self-described “insanity guru” Ian McIntyre, who lends his offbeat lyrical prowness to intricate bass strummings, the trio is rounded off by drummer Jon McCann – a stick wizard – and guitarist Jeff McLarnon, who remains one step back from McIntyre but makes his presence known.

The last names of the band’s three members – McIntyre, McCann and McLarnon – would lead one to expect a wrinkly recording of Irish alehouse staples. Rather, prepare yourself for a 360 degree turnaround; this is power punch rock in the tradition of the Lemonheads with not a single whiskey or jig or reel tune to speak of. Think toe-tapping melodic ditties of the not-too-heavy-but-just-hard-enough school. These guys do not concern themselves with preachy life lessons (despite the quirky “Christian Soldiers”) or garbled, indistinguishable vocals. This is fortunate as the light-hearted vibe of these songs is exactly what produces their unmistakable charm. If you’re looking for a quirkier Sloan (possible?) this is the CD for you.

If there is a negative to speak of on The Intentions it is the usual indie curse: production that overshadows and hides the true talents of the band. The sound of the the recording is good but not great – a criticism that pales in comparison to the many positives here – but still detracts from the overall effect.

The status of the band will only correct this unfortunate flaw, but rest assured status is in this band’s cards. Songs like the very memorable “Here I Go Again On My Own”, which features smooth, delicate vocals, along with the head-bobbing “Welcome To Hobbiton” best sum up the band’s abilities: funky, intelligent and sincere.

Cross three talented Toronto instrumentalists with smart songwriting abilities and a knack for subtle humor and the resulting product is independent upstarts The Intentions. Formed around the energy of self-described “insanity guru” Ian McIntyre, who lends his offbeat lyrical prowness to intricate bass strummings, the trio is rounded off by drummer Jon McCann – a stick wizard – and guitarist Jeff McLarnon, who remains one step back from McIntyre but makes his presence known.

The last names of the band’s three members – McIntyre, McCann and McLarnon – would lead one to expect a wrinkly recording of Irish alehouse staples. Rather, prepare yourself for a 360 degree turnaround; this is power punch rock in the tradition of the Lemonheads with not a single whiskey or jig or reel tune to speak of. Think toe-tapping melodic ditties of the not-too-heavy-but-just-hard-enough school. These guys do not concern themselves with preachy life lessons (despite the quirky “Christian Soldiers”) or garbled, indistinguishable vocals. This is fortunate as the light-hearted vibe of these songs is exactly what produces their unmistakable charm. If you’re looking for a quirkier Sloan (possible?) this is the CD for you.

If there is a negative to speak of on The Intentions it is the usual indie curse: production that overshadows and hides the true talents of the band. The sound of the the recording is good but not great – a criticism that pales in comparison to the many positives here – but still detracts from the overall effect.

The status of the band will only correct this unfortunate flaw, but rest assured status is in this band’s cards. Songs like the very memorable “Here I Go Again On My Own”, which features smooth, delicate vocals, along with the head-bobbing “Welcome To Hobbiton” best sum up the band’s abilities: funky, intelligent and sincere.